Restoring a Classic Car

A customer recently asked for our thoughts on restoring a classing early 1970s MG.

Now you may be wondering just what this has to do with something such as Sydney luxury car hire. Well, nothing really!  As you might have guessed though, we have a deep interest in motor vehicles here at Bayside Limousines and some of us have dabbled in this area.

So, here are a very few and very basic tips if you’re contemplating engaging in a classic car restoration.

  1. Don’t even think about making a profit out of it! About 99% of all people restoring classics end up hugely under-estimating the costs and that can destroy any profit margin possibilities. If you’re restoring as a hobby and for your own use, then great. Don’t make the “classic mistake” of assuming that you can take your purchase plus restoration costs, add on 50% when finished and then sell it to an army of eager buyers – you’ll probably be disappointed!
  1. Look for classics that need restoration but not those that really are only fit for scrapping. It’s sometimes a very fine line and expert advice might be advisable.
  1. Try to choose a vehicle that spare parts can still be found for. Surprisingly, they are still available for many vintage cars back to the early 70s or late 60s but not all. Almost all cars from say 1965 back can prove a challenge in terms of finding parts.
  1. Look for vehicles that have a sound chassis and sub-frame. Almost all other parts of the vehicle can be restored or re-machined with some degree of confidence but if the chassis has rusted through and huge amounts of welding are required, well, good luck and be prepared to start writing some serious cheques!
  1. Brush up on the laws with respect to classic cars on the road. They’re not too bad or restrictive but be sure you understand them before you start.
  1. Remember that purity in restoration is an admirable objective but do remember that many classic cars were, by today’s standards, dangerous. Think about compromise with regard to modern safety devices and systems.

Have fun and good luck!